A train to photography street

DSC07639.jpg

When I have some time off from everything, I like to take the subway downtown to mosey around. One of these days, I was randomly browsing in a book store, and I happened upon a book about street photography. And for some reason, a switch flicked in my head.

Since then I have been chasing “the decisive moment”, so to say. Not much to show for it yet, but even an epic quest can begin with a stumble.

Norwegian news agency NTB declares King dead – retracted soon after

King Harald is dead, said NTB.

Nah, the King is fine. He’s just out Elk-hunting, said court.

On this sad day, our thougts and prayers go to the unfortunate people responsible for the impromptu publication of the obituary of Norwegian King Harald at NTB. We feel your pain.

Source: Norsk Telegrambyrå erklærte kongen død – NRK Kultur og underholdning – Nyheter og aktuelt stoff

World’s oldest emoji is 3 700 years old


Photo: Turko-Italian Archeological Expedition, Karkemish

Emojis are not exactly new, but that they were this old…

Smithsonian reports from archeological excavations on the border between Syria and Turkey. The Hittites were early adopters of hip mugs, it turns out. The mugs were used to store a sweet drink called sherbet.

I can picture it clearly: “Buy cool sherbet-mugs for your kids at Hattusa’s bazar. Superb quality guaranteed to outlast both you and your entire civilisation!”

Handwriting engages the brain more deeply than typing – enabling better retention and focus


As Quartz reports, The pen is not only mightier than the sword, but in some cases also mightier than the keyboard.

It may well be that the physicality of shaping letters cements concepts in the mind. For example, to type the word “typing,” I made the same motion on the keyboard six times, choosing which letter to type but not forming them. But if I were to write the same thing by hand, I’d have to shape six different letters and put them together. That takes more effort and seems to both demand more of the brain and leave a deeper imprint on the mind than typing. That imprint appears to be critical when learning new things.

Plus, there’s the priceless benefit of limiting distraction. Technology can be a trap. The simple act of shutting your laptop and putting pen to paper can help you to improve focus.