A train to photography street

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When I have some time off from everything, I like to take the subway downtown to mosey around. One of these days, I was randomly browsing in a book store, and I happened upon a book about street photography. And for some reason, a switch flicked in my head.

Since then I have been chasing “the decisive moment”, so to say. Not much to show for yet, but even an epic quest can begin with a stumble.

Norwegian news agency NTB declares King dead – retracted soon after

King Harald is dead, said NTB.

Nah, the King is fine. He’s just out Elk-hunting, said court.

On this sad day, our thougts and prayers go to the unfortunate people responsible for the impromptu publication of the obituary of Norwegian King Harald at NTB. We feel your pain.

Source: Norsk Telegrambyrå erklærte kongen død – NRK Kultur og underholdning – Nyheter og aktuelt stoff

Verdens eldste emoji er 3700 år gammel


Foto: Turko-Italian Archeological Expedition, Karkemish

Emojier er ikke akkurat noe nytt, men at det var så gammelt…

Smithsonian rapporterer fra arkeologiske utgravinger på grensen mellom Syria og Tyrkia. Hetiittene var tidlig ute med hippe mugger, viser det seg. Muggene ble brukt til å drikke en søt drikk kalt sherbet.

Ser det for meg: «Kjøp kule sherbet-krus til kidza på Hattusas bazaar! Superb kvalitet som varer lengre enn både deg og hele din sivilisasjon!»

Handwriting engages the brain more deeply than typing – enabling better retention and focus


As Quartz reports, The pen is not only mightier than the sword, but in some cases also mightier than the keyboard.

It may well be that the physicality of shaping letters cements concepts in the mind. For example, to type the word “typing,” I made the same motion on the keyboard six times, choosing which letter to type but not forming them. But if I were to write the same thing by hand, I’d have to shape six different letters and put them together. That takes more effort and seems to both demand more of the brain and leave a deeper imprint on the mind than typing. That imprint appears to be critical when learning new things.

Plus, there’s the priceless benefit of limiting distraction. Technology can be a trap. The simple act of shutting your laptop and putting pen to paper can help you to improve focus.

The best way to read a book is very slowly

By keeping a book in one location, you form a relationship between the book, yourself, and the room where you read it. Via Quartz:

By keeping your book in one location each time, you free yourself from the distractions of a commute or the pounding waves of a beach. As a result, a strange new relationship forms, between you, the voice of the book, and the room. Your ritual creates a singular association between the book and a quiet, private place, which in turn gives your relationship a new dimension. Your friend never leaves your room, has never seen you with makeup on, or shoes.